Physicians and Staff

  Scott E. Strome, M.D., FACS

Professor and Chair of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Chief of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland Medical Center

Dr. Scott E. Strome, a nationally recognized head and neck surgeon and researcher studying novel ways to harness the body’s immune system to fight cancer, is chair of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is also chief of Otorhinolaryngology at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The department provides patient care, research and training in conditions that affect the ear, nose and throat.

Dr. Strome received his BA from Dartmouth College in 1987 and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1991. He subsequently completed a combined 6-year internship/residency program at the University of Michigan Medical Center in 1997 and a head and neck surgery/microvascular reconstructive fellowship with Dr. Richard Hayden in 1998. He accepted a faculty position in the Department of Oto-HNS at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in 1998, where he practiced until being recruited to head the Department of Oto-HNS at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Dr. Strome’s clinical interests include thyroid, salivary gland and laryngeal malignancies, melanoma, and head and neck reconstruction. He has developed a new peptide vaccine targeting human papilloma virus 16, a major cause of head and neck cancer. He also assisted his father, Marshall Strome, M.D., a head and neck surgeon, in developing the technique for the world’s first human total laryngeal transplant. The elder Dr. Strome performed the transplant at The Cleveland Clinic in 1998.

Dr. Strome runs a large translational research program, has a long history of federal funding, and has published extensively in leading scientific journals.



  Thomas T. Le, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Director, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Maryland Medical Center

Dr. Thomas T. Le is director of facial plastic surgery and an assistant professor in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In addition to managing a facial cosmetic surgery practice, he serves as a facial reconstructive surgeon at the R Adams Shock Trauma Center and as a facial specialist at the Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. His area-specific interests include rhinoplasty, nasal reconstruction, and aging face surgery (eyelift, facelift, and necklift).

He graduated with highest honors from the University of Louisville School of Medicine, garnering, among other awards, the Kash Award in Anatomy and the Barbour Award in Pharmacology. His accomplishments gained him early induction as a junior medical student into Alpha Omega Alpha. Before and during medical school, Dr. Le performed lipoprotein and molecular biology research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., and at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga.

Dr. Le subsequently completed an internship in General Surgery and a residency in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at St. Louis University School of Medicine, where he won the Resident Research Award. He then became an instructor and fellow of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Miami in Miami, Fla., a mecca for plastic surgery. Throughout his training, Dr. Le logged over 3,400 facial, head, and neck procedures and worked with several nationally renowned facial plastic surgeons, including J. Regan Thomas, MD, and Robert L. Simons, MD (both former presidents of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery), as well as Richard Davis, MD, Julio Gallo, MD, and Brian Jewett, MD.













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