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Cystic Fibrosis: Breathing New Life Into Age-Old Treatments

A Live Pediatric Grand Rounds CME Presentation.
September 27, 2007 at 8:00 AM EDT (12:00 UTC)
From Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
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Lung Disease: As one of the leading pediatric hospitals in the nation, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC is at the forefront of cystic fibrosis research and treatments. Join a nationally recognized authority of Cystic Fibrosis, David M. Orenstein, MD, director, Antonio J. and Janet Palumbo Cystic Fibrosis Center, and author of several books on the subject in a live Webcast that will cover past treatments that are still viable today, exciting new therapies that will be realized in our lifetime, and the latest updates on newborn screening. Don't miss this opportunity to share in the latest results, discoveries and treatments that are making a powerful difference in the world.  MORE...
Lung Disease: As one of the leading pediatric hospitals in the nation, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC is at the forefront of cystic fibrosis research and treatments. Join a nationally recognized authority of Cystic Fibrosis, David M. Orenstein, MD, director, Antonio J. and Janet Palumbo Cystic Fibrosis Center, and author of several books on the subject in a live Webcast that will cover past treatments that are still viable today, exciting new therapies that will be realized in our lifetime, and the latest updates on newborn screening. Don't miss this opportunity to share in the latest results, discoveries and treatments that are making a powerful difference in the world.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease characterized by an abnormality in the body's salt, water- and mucus-making cells. Approximately 1,000 babies are born with it each year. It is chronic, progressive, and is usually fatal. In general, children with Cystic Fibrosis live into their 30s.

Children with CF have an abnormality in the function of a cell protein called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). CFTR controls the flow of water and certain salts in and out of the body's cells. As the movement of salt and water in and out of cells is altered, mucus becomes thickened. The thickened mucus can affect many organs and body systems including respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and sweat glands.

Topics covered in Webcast:

  • Airway clearance & chest physical therapy Issues
  • Improvements in survival
  • New therapies in clinical trials
  • Protein Repair Therapy
  • Early diagnosis and treatment in newborns

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