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Brigham and Women's Hospital Features Live Webcast of New Angioplasty and Stenting Treatment for Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Disease

Newer endovascular techniques eliminate open surgery for patients suffering from this disease
First Broadcast Live,
May 11, 2005 at 4:30 PM EDT (00:00 UTC)
From Brigham and Women's Hospital Cardiovascular Center

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BOSTON, MA- Brigham and Women's Hospital Cardiovascular Center hosted a live Webcast for viewers to watch and learn more about endovascular stenting for the treatment of atherosclerotic carotid stenosis, a blockage of the main artery to the neck that is a common cause of stroke in America.

This procedure represents a true collaborative effort - bringing together the expertise of the BWH cardiac catheterization  MORE...

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BOSTON, MA- Brigham and Women's Hospital Cardiovascular Center hosted a live Webcast for viewers to watch and learn more about endovascular stenting for the treatment of atherosclerotic carotid stenosis, a blockage of the main artery to the neck that is a common cause of stroke in America.

This procedure represents a true collaborative effort - bringing together the expertise of the BWH cardiac catheterization laboratory and its vascular surgery department - a combination that benefits patient outcomes.

Atherosclerotic disease of the cervical carotid arteries is one of the primary causes of stroke in the United States affecting millions of Americans. Approximately 150,000 open surgical procedures to treat this disease are performed in the US each year. In the past decade, great progress has been made in the endovascular treatment of atherosclerotic disease that has been extended to the carotid arteries.

For physicians, this procedure is CME accredited with Harvard Medical School (HMS). The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) accredits HMS to provide continuing medical education for physicians. HMS designates this educational activity for a maximum of one category one credit toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity.

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