Replay of: Intraperitoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy for Persistent Cancer in Live Internet Broadcast

An Adjunct Therapy for Cancer that Persists Despite Surgical and other Treatments

First Seen Live Webcast: November 17, 2005 at 5:00 PM ET (22:00 UTC)




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Peritoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy
 

A major difficulty in treating patients with cancer that has spread widely on lining surfaces in the stomach cavity (abdomen, peritoneal cavity) is that it is often not possible to remove all the cancer cells. As a result, the cancer often persists despite surgical and other treatments.

Since 1993, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has been researching and performing intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) as an additional treatment with surgery. More than 400 patients have been treated with this approach.

 
  Peritoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy

After surgically removing all visible cancer in the abdomen, IPHC is used to apply heated chemotherapy agents directly to the abdominal cavity to kill remaining cancer cells. The solution is circulated between the abdomen and a perfusion pump.

 
  Peritoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy

On Thursday Nov. 17 at 5 p.m., Edward A. Levine, M.D., professor of surgical oncology at Wake Forest Baptist performed surgery and IPHC during a live internet broadcast.

This procedure is being offered as standard treatment on the basis of results from clinical trials. The goal of the surgery is to remove as much tumor as possible, preserve as much normal tissue as possible and preserve organ function to improve quality of life and longevity.

Once considered a palliative treatment, more and more patients are surviving for many years, offering the hope that IPHC may one day be considered curative for some cancers.



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