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Advanced Corrective Procedure for Cardiac Arrhythmia

Webcast to highlight specialized care for women with heart rhythm problems
First Broadcast Live:
June 14, 2006 at 4:30 PM EDT (20:30 UTC)
From Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA

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Boston, MA – On Wednesday, June 14, 2006 at 4:30 p.m. ET, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) electrophysiologists will demonstrate a live catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), a type of cardiac arrhythmia or heart rhythm problem that can be more common in women and can exhibit significant symptoms. Designed to educate physicians and patients about SVT and discuss the latest catheter ablation procedure, the webcast will also provide information about specialized care for women with cardiac arrhythmias from specialists at the BWH Women and Arrhythmias Program.

SVT symptoms can begin at any age and can have a major impact on quality-of-life. During an SVT episode, the heart can beat faster than 200 beats  MORE...
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Boston, MA – On Wednesday, June 14, 2006 at 4:30 p.m. ET, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) electrophysiologists will demonstrate a live catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), a type of cardiac arrhythmia or heart rhythm problem that can be more common in women and can exhibit significant symptoms. Designed to educate physicians and patients about SVT and discuss the latest catheter ablation procedure, the webcast will also provide information about specialized care for women with cardiac arrhythmias from specialists at the BWH Women and Arrhythmias Program.

SVT symptoms can begin at any age and can have a major impact on quality-of-life. During an SVT episode, the heart can beat faster than 200 beats per minute – sometimes more than three times the average resting heart rate of 60 to 80 beats per minute – and, when severe, can result in lightheadedness and fainting. SVT and other arrhythmias can often be cured by catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure that involves the insertion of catheters (wires) into the heart. Using advanced imaging to guide the catheters to the arrhythmia source, electrophysiologists deliver radiofrequency electrical energy to selectively eliminate the heart cells that are causing the rhythm disturbance.

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